Courses

Catalog Course Listing: Undergraduate

W = World       E = European       A = American

HIST 1110.  World History and Civilization to 1500 (3 hours).   A general survey of the cultural, religious, political, and social development of major world civilizations from their beginnings to c. 1500. W

HIST 1120. World History and Civilization since 1500 (3 hours). A general survey of the cultural, religious, political, and social development of major world civilizations from 1500 to the present. W

HIST 2010. The United States to 1877 (three hours). A survey of the settlement and development of the colonies, the revolutionary period, the making of the Constitution, the diplomatic, economic, and political problems of the new government, the nature of economic sectionalism, Jacksonian democracy, territorial expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.  This course is a required course in the undergraduate core.

HIST 2020. The United States since 1877 (3 hours).  Growth of the United States as an industrial and world power since Reconstruction.  This course is a required course in the undergraduate core.

HIST 2030. History of Tennessee (3 hours).  An intensive study of selected periods and topics in Tennessee history.   A

HIST 3020. Minority and Ethnic History (3 hours). A study of selected minority and ethnic groups in the United States with attention to geographical origin, migration patterns and their impact on and adaptation to American culture. A

HIST 3310. Ancient History (3 hours). A survey of the origins of ancient urban civilization, including the river valley civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia, Israel, and Greece, with emphasis on the development of cultural, religious, political, and social institutions.  W/E

HIST 3320. Medieval History (3 hours). Prerequisites: HIST 1010, 2010, and 2020, or by the permission of the instructor.  Introduction to the study of Medieval history from the decline of ancient civilization to the beginning of the Renaissance.  Emphasis on institutional, cultural, economic, and religious development.      E

HIST 3330. Main Currents of Early Modern Europe (3 hours). A study of the major forces and events that shaped Europe from the mid-sixteenth century to the French Revolution: the Reformation and wars of religion, absolutism and constitutionalism, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, and aspects of popular culture (witchcraft craze, marriage and family life, religion).  E

HIST 3340. Modern Europe (3 hours). A study of the 19th-century origins of Modern Europe; the development of the European industrial economy and society; diplomatic developments and the nature of the balance-of-power system; Europe and the two World Wars; the development of post-World War II Europe.   E

HIST 3410. Introduction to Historical Methods (3 hours). An introductory survey of historical methods and thinking, including consideration of the philosophy of history, historiography, historical research, and the writing of history.

HIST 3710. A Survey of the Middle East (3 hours). A survey of the land, people, and the problems of the Middle East from ancient times to the modern period.  W

HIST 3720. History of Africa (3 hours). An introduction to the history of the entire African continent from earliest times to the present.  Primary emphasis is placed on the achievements of Africans rather than those of foreigners in Africa.   W

HIST 3730. Conquest to Independence in Latin America (3 hours). A study of the colonial period and independence movements with emphasis upon colonial and early national institutions that are of significance for understanding the peculiar mix of reaction and revolution visible in contemporary Latin America.    W

HIST 3740. History of Asia (3 hours). A survey of Asian history from earliest times which stresses the formation and development of the long-lived political cultures of China and Japan, including their strategies for protecting their national sovereignty.   W

HIST 3900.  African American History to 1877 (3 hours).  African American History to 1877 is a survey course which explores the political, economic, social, and cultural experiences of African Americans, from their African roots through the Reconstruction period in America.  The course will emphasize the struggle for equality along with the collective and individual contributions of African Americans to U.S. and world culture. A

HIST 3901. African American History since 1877 (3 hours). 
African American History since 1877 is a survey course which explores the political, economic, social, and cultural experiences of African Americans, from Reconstruction to the present.  This course emphasizes the Civil Rights Movement, along with the struggles and achievements of African Americans.   A

HIST 3910. History of Christianity (3 hours).  A survey of the history of the Christian movement, from the early Church to the diverse expressions of Christianity in modern times.    W/E

HIST 3920. History of Islam (3 hours). A survey of pre-Islamic Arabia, the Prophet and his career, the Qur'an, doctrine and ritual law, Sufism, sects in Islam, the Caliphate and Islam in the modern world.  W

HIST 3930. History of Science (3 hours). A study of the development of science and technology and the effects on human history from classical to modern times.

HIST 3940. War in the Modern World (3 hours). A study of war since the 18th century, including how armies reflect the values of society; changes in warfare in the modern era; the American way of war; strategy, tactics, generalship, weapons, and the impact of war on society. E/A

HIST 3950 Special Topics (3 hours).  A series of special interest subjects will be offered under this title on the basis of interest and faculty capability.  The course may be repeated, with different subject material.

HIST 3989-99.  Cooperative Education (1-3 hours).

HIST 4017/5017. Beginnings of America (3 hours). A history of the establishment of European settlements in America and the development of the colonies in the 16th and 17th centuries. A

HIST 4037/4057. The American Revolution (3 hours). A study of the origins and development of revolutionary sentiment in 18th century America.  A

HIST 4047/5047. The Early Republic (3 hours). A study of the Federalist Period, the Jeffersonian Revolution, and the War of 1812.   A

HIST 4057/5057. The Age of Jackson (3 hours). A study of the era of good feelings, the age of Jackson, sectionalism, and territorial expansion to the eve of the Civil War.  A

HIST 4067/5067. The Civil War (3 hours)An advanced course in the history of the Civil War, with emphasis upon secession, economic and military mobilization, battles and campaigns and the cultural, diplomatic, and political developments in the period from 1861 to 1865.  A

HIST 4097/5097. The Emergence of the United States, 1865-1933 (3 hours). Prerequisites: HIST 2010 and 2020.  A study of the rise of big business, big labor, big government, and the agrarians in the late 19th century; the Progressive Movement, World War I, League of Nations, and the Depression.   A

HIST 4107/5107. Recent United States, 1933-Present (3 hours). Prerequisites:HIST 2010 and 2020.  A study of the New Deal, World War II, the significant changes in American society since the war and the exercise of great power status in international affairs in the third quarter of the 20th century.   A

HIST 4117/5117. American Diplomacy (3 hours). A brief sketch of the major themes in American foreign policy before 1898 will be followed by intensive treatment of more recent diplomatic policies and problems. A

HIST 4127/5127. Social and Intellectual History of the U.S. to 1877 (3 hours). A study of selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American history for the colonial period to the end of Reconstruction.  A

HIST 4137/5137. Social and Intellectual History of the U.S. since 1877 (3 hours). A study of selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.  A continuation of HIST 4127.   A

HIST 4147/5157. The Old South, 1607-1869 (3 hours).  An advanced course in the history of the South from colonial times to the Civil War, with emphasis upon economic, social, and political developments, including the slavery controversy.    A

HIST 4157/5157. The South Since 1865 (3 hours). A study of the recent South with special attention to its politics, economy, society, culture, and relationship to national history.   A

HIST 4167/5167.  History of Southern Appalachians (3 hours).  A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Southern Appalachia from settlement to the 20th century. A

HIST 4177/5177.  The West in the Life of the Nation (3 hours).  A study of westward expansion and the impact of the frontier on American institutions from the old Southwest and Northwestern frontiers to the Pacific Coast.  A

HIST 4197/5197. Urban History (3 hours). A study of political, social, and economic aspects of urbanization in the United States.   A


HIST 4207/5207. Ancient Religions (3 hours) A study of the origins, development, and function of religion in the ancient world of the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, Greece, Rome, and Europe.  The course will cover the religions of Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine, Greece, and Rome, as well as Gnosticism, Jainism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Zoroastrianism. W/E

HIST 4217/5217. History of Ancient Greece (3 hours).  A study of ancient Greece from its origins in the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic Age, with special emphasis on the political, philosophical, and intellectual ideas which form the basis of Western civilization.    E

HIST 4227/5227.  History of Rome (3 hours).  A survey of ancient Rome from its origins to the fourth century A.D., including the Regal period, the Struggle of the Order, the growth of the Republic, Roman institutions, the Roman conquest of Italy, expansion, the fall of the Republic, the growth of autocracy, adjustments in the Empire, the early Christian Church, and the culture of Rome and its subject peoples.   E

HIST 4230. Renaissance and Reformation Europe (3 hours).  A survey of Europe during its transition from medieval to early modern times, with emphasis on the roots of the Renaissance culture of the 15th and the religious upheaval of the 16th century and their impact on institutions and behavior, including the role of women, family life, popular culture, witchcraft/the occult, and the rise of modern science.   E


HIST 4237/5237
. Women in the Ancient World (3 hours) A study of the history and circumstances of women in antiquity, including the cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. W/E


HIST 4327/5327.
Expansion of Europe Overseas, Since 1492 (3 hours).  W/E

HIST 4357/5367. Intellectual History of Europe to the French Revolution (3 hours).  A study of the history of European thought and culture from the origin of the Renaissance to the end of the Enlightenment.   E

HIST 4377/5377. Intellectual History of Europe since the French Revolution (3 hours).  A study of the history of European thought from the French Revolution to the present day.  E

HIST 4417/5417.  Methods of teaching history (3 hours).  Contents and methods for teaching history and social studies with emphasis on secondary education.  This course earns education credit only and does not meet requirements for the History major, minor, the MA or the MAT degree. 

HIST 4507/5507.  England to 1714 (3 hours).  A survey of English history from the Roman period to the 18th century.  This coure will examine the main themes of England's heritage: Christianity, medieval monarchy, common law , the Tudor dynasty, with considerable attention to how men and women lived, worked, prayed, studied and enjoyed life.  E

HIST 4517/5517.  England, 1714-Present (3 hours).  A study of British history from 1688 to the present with primary attention directed to the political, economic, and social changes that led the nation from an agrarian and aristocratic kingdom to an industrial and democratic state in the 20th century. E

HIST 4527/5527. Modern France (3 hours).  A study of the causes and consequences of the Great Revolution, the first Napoleon, the Restoration, the revolutions of 1830 and 1848, Napoleon III, and the persistent problems of modern France seen in the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Republics. E

HIST 4607/5607.  History of Russia to 1917 (3 hours).  A study of politics, society, and culture in Russia from the Kievan Rus to the end of tsarism, with emphasis on the later period.    E

HIST 4617/5617. History of Russia since 1917 (3 hours). A study of Russia, with emphasis on politics, ideology, culture, and economic development from the collapse of tsarism and the Russian Revolution through the Soviet period and the post-Soviet period, including the successor states  . E

HIST 4627/5627. Modern Germany (3 hours).  A study of the causes and consequences of German unification; the Bismarkian period; the Wilhelminian Age; Weltpolitik and World War I; the Weimar Republic; Hitler and the Nazi Era; World War II and its aftermath.  Emphasis will be placed on political, economic, social, and diplomatic developments.   E

HIST 4707/5707 East Asia since 1900 (3 hours). A survey of the transformation of China and Japan in the 2oth century by capitalism, parliamentarianism, militarism, revolution, and nationalism; Japan's rise as international trader and creditor and China's plans to leave the Third World by the mid-21st century.    W

HIST 4717/5717. Modern Middle East, 1800-Present (3 hours). A study of the Middle East from Napoleon to Khomeini, with emphasis on modernization trends and Islamic responses.  W

HIST 4727/5727. Modern Africa (3 hours).  An advanced, in-depth examination of African social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual history since about 1880, with special emphasis on the reestablishment of African independence.   W

HIST 4730. Latin America: Revolution and Nationalism (3 hours). A study of the national development of several Latin American countries (Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, and Brazil) to show some of the dramatic differences as well as some of the common features of Latin American social, economic, and political structures today.    W

HIST 4900. Independent Study (1-3 hours). The Independent Study option is designed for students who would like to pursue study in areas of history not covered in the department's regular curriculum.  Students are expected to work independently, but under the supervision of a faculty member.  Students desiring to use this option must prepare for appropriate signatures a written application with the faculty member which describes course objectives, research methods (including reading list), requirements for presentation of findings of such independent study, anticipated date for completion of all requirements, and the method of faculty's evaluation of the independent study project.

HIST 4910. Survey of the Modern World (3 hours). Prerequisites: Suggested that majors and minors have taken HIST 1010 and/or 1020, 2010 and 2020.  A recapitulation and synthesis of the main themes of modern history designed to enable majors and minors to acquire a reasonable overview of the past. No longer required for History majors and minors, but still a required course for those going into secondary education with a certification in History.   W/E

HIST 4957/5957. Special Topics in History (3 hours).  A series of special interest subjects will be offered under this title on the basis of interest and faculty capability.  The course may be repeated, with different subject material.


Catalog Course Listings: Graduate

All 5xx7 courses may be found cross-listed on the Catalog Course Listings: Undergraduate page.

HIST 5010. Studies in United States History (3 hours).  Directed research in selected topics in the history of the United States .  May be taken repeatedly with different topics.

HIST 5020. Studies in European History (3 hours). Directed research in selected topics in European history.  May be taken repeatedly with different topics.

HIST 5030. Studies in World History (3 hours).  Directed research in selected areas of history other than United States or Europe.  May be taken repeatedly with different topics.

HIST 5900.  Independent Studies (1-3 hours).  Independent reading, research, and writing in selected topics on the graduate level.

HIST 5940.  Studies in Historiography (3 hours). Required of all students. This course is a study of selected historians and philosophers and their interpretations of the nature and purpose of History.  Currently explores the speculative philosophies of History through the Greek philosophers, Greek historians, St. Augustine, Hegel, Marx, Burckhart, Nietzsche, with some consideration of Kant, Schophenhauer, and others.

HIST 5950.  Introduction to Historical Research (3 hours).  Required of all students. The objective of this course is to familiarize graduate students with research methodology and professional standards shared by practitioners in this discipline.  This training is fundamental for those who expect to terminate their formal education with an M.A., as well as those who anticipate the pursuit of a Ph.D. in history. 

HIST 5960. Thesis (3 hours).

HIST 5990. Reading and Research (1-3 hours).  Students who are not enrolled in other course work but require the use of university facilities and/or faculty guidance for studies, research, or preparation of a prospectus, thesis, or dissertation MUST enroll for three hours of Reading and Research.  Variable hours (1-3) of Reading and Research may be used, as approved by the student's advisory committee in conjunction with other course work, to receive credit for such activities as preparation of designated papers or development of research and scholarly skills that would not be appropriately covered in other types of independent studies.  Grading of Reading and Research will be either Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

HIST 5989-99. Cooperative Education (variable credit).  Students must clear arrangements for this course through the Cooperative Education Office prior to registration.  Business, industries, and government agencies provide opportunities for planned and supervised work assignments.  Students may alternate between periods (usually two semesters) of full-time study and employment with a cooperative education employer.  Credit received carries full academic value, and students receive compensation as full-time employees .


Please note: Seminars (5010, 5020, 5030) cover a wide variety of subjects.  The subjects posted in these syllabi are just a few of those which are offered.



L ast modified:  Ides of August, in the 2762th ab urbe condita (from the Foundation of the City, Rome, that is....for those of you on a different calendar).