Film Studies Minor: Schedule

Summer Session 1: (06/10/13-07/12/13)

ENGL-3290-904
Introduction to Film
McManus

Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 and 1020 or equivalents. "As good a way as any towards understanding what a film is trying to say to us is to know how it is saying it" (André Bazin). This course serves as an introduction to the study of film, providing students with a basic set of tools for analyzing moving images in order to learn how films communicate meaning. For this purpose, we will break down the complex processes of filmmaking in order to understand the many different aspects that determine the meaning of a finished shot, scene, or film. We will look at the basic components of film style – from mise-en-scène through cinematography to editing and sound—and we will consider different principles of narration as well as the construction of non-narrative films. We will also familiarize ourselves with the basic terminology for film analysis, and we will explore the relation between film form and culture in selected case studies. Required text: Film Art, An Introduction (w/access card). Bordwell. McGraw-Hill, 10th Ed.*This course is writing-intensive.

Summer Session 2: (07/15/13 – 08/16/13)

ENGL-4507-210
Literature in Film: "Shakespeare in Film"
Sawyer

Prerequisites: ENGL-1010 and 1020 or equivalents. By looking at Shakespearean films as exciting, rich, and meaningful texts themselves, this class will consider cinematic Shakespeare as a contribution to the reinterpretation and appropriation of his works. We will also discuss relevant issues as they arise (race, class, gender, and sexuality). The course will focus primarily on film adaptations that follow the texts closely, but it will also examine films that might incorporate Shakespeare in a more original manner.

Fall Semester: (08/24/13 – 12/12/13)

ENGL-3290-201
Introduction to Film
McManus

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and 1020 or equivalents. "As good a way as any towards understanding what a film is trying to say to us is to know how it is saying it" (André Bazin). This course serves as an introduction to the study of film, providing students with a basic set of tools for analyzing moving images in order to learn how films communicate meaning. For this purpose, we will break down the complex processes of filmmaking in order to understand the many different aspects that determine the meaning of a finished shot, scene, or film. We will look at the basic components of film style – from mise-en-scène through cinematography to editing and sound—and we will consider different principles of narration as well as the construction of non-narrative films. We will also familiarize ourselves with the basic terminology for film analysis, and we will explore the relation between film form and culture in selected case studies. *This course is writing-intensive. Required text: Film Art, An Introduction (w/access card). Bordwell. McGraw-Hill, 10th Ed.*This course is writing-intensive.

ENGL-3290-904
Introduction to Film
Hurd

Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 and 1020 or equivalents.This course introduces students to the aesthetics of film. After learning the basic concepts of film form and considering the artistic possibilities of film techniques, students analyze specific films, both inside and outside of class, to sharpen their perception of conceptual skills. Although films are primarily analyzed as artworks, (cont...) attention is paid to film production, including the concept of authorship. This course also surveys the most noteworthy periods and movements in film history. Required text: Film Art, An Introduction (w/access card). Bordwell. McGraw-Hill, 10th Ed.*This course is writing-intensive.

ENGL-3350-001
Film History
Hall

Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 or equivalent. This course is an overview of the history of film from 1895 to the present. This course is required for film studies minors and is foundational to understanding the discipline.

ENGL-4290-201
Film Genres: Romantic Comedies
McManus

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and 1020 or equivalents. Romantic comedies have us engage norms and beliefs about social relationships and cultural concerns—specifically those of sexuality and gender—by having us experience them as humorous. What we find as humorous about relationships, and what kinds of relationships are shown on the screen, are in a process of continual change. We will consider different generic manifestations of romantic comedy, as well as its many sub-genres, with an eye to discern similarities and differences of its varied conventions, iconography, and narratives across historical and cultural contexts.

ENGL-4340-201
Topics in Film: Independent Cinema
McManus

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and 1020 or equivalents. Independent cinema in the United States is now a complicated affair, for its close relationship with Hollywood puts into question of what exactly it is independent from today. However, over the years, independent cinema has been understood to demonstrate various forms of independence from Hollywood—whether in terms of its institutional framework, aesthetic and formal strategies, or types of narratives and characters—and to offer a different means of filmmaking and spectatorship. We will trace a history of independent cinema from the late 1970s until today, as well as what this term has meant, in order to isolate key figures, films, interpretations of independence, and audience experiences and expectations. We will find that, just as mainstream modes of filmmaking have changed over the years, so too did the modes of independent cinema change along the way, which perhaps helps us understand how the two gradually intersected.

ENGL-4507/5507-201
Literature in Film: Crime, Detection and Mystery
Cody

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and 1020 or equivalents. Much of the fiction of crime, detection and mystery has long been relegated to the realms of guilty pleasure and summer reading. But this doesn't have to be the case! The best work in this diverse genre stakes serious claims to literary validity and critical attention. Many of these gems have been adapted to films as well, appearing on the big screen and the small. Experiences in this course will allow students the opportunity to develop their critical reading and thinking skills in relation to not only literary and cinematic works but also our culture's pervasive interest in criminal behavior and criminal minds. Alongside our considerations of the techniques and structures of both literature and film, we'll explore what representations of criminal and aberrant behavior reveal about the cultures and societies in which these stories were written. Texts (books and related films) include The Maltese Falcon, The Long Goodbye, Strangers on a Train, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, A Thief of Time, In the Electric Mist with Confederate Dead and Memento.



We will post information about courses offered for future sessions once we have confirmed them. For more information about the Film Studies minor, contact Dr. Stanton McManus ().