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  • Dr. Matt McBee's article, 'Effects of schoolwide cluster grouping and within-class ability grouping on elementary school students’ academic achievement growth' published in High Ability Studies, was the journal's Most Read article throughout 2014. High Ability Studies most read article in 2014!
    Dr. Matt McBee's article, 'Effects of schoolwide cluster grouping and within-class ability grouping on elementary school students’ academic achievement growth' published in High Ability Studies, was the journal's Most Read article throughout 2014.
  • All three clinical students who participated in this year’s pre-doctoral internship match successfully matched Sarah Hill, Jamie Tedder, and Matthew Tolliver matched for pre-doctoral internships! Congratulations!
    All three clinical students who participated in this year’s pre-doctoral internship match successfully matched
  • Click to see the video of Sellers (who does ALS research) and Dula take the challenge ETSU Psych Dept Faculty Took the #IceBucketChallenge to help #StrikeOutALS
    Click to see the video of Sellers (who does ALS research) and Dula take the challenge
  • Clinical PhD Concentration is APA Accredited

Data Blitz Audience

We had a Data Blitz!

On March 6th, the Department of Psychology sponsored a Faculty Data Blitz. What is that, you say? Ten presenters each had five minutes to present recent or current research with one minute between presentations. Topics from sex offending to religion, and Al Pacino to Lindsay Lohan (you had to be there)!

Data Blitz Shark Fans

  Faculty gathered to present on the following topics:

  • Dr. Andi Clements, Religious Commitment & Health
  • Dr. Ginni Blackhart, The Influence of Social Anxiety on Self-Control Following Social Interaction
  • Dr. Shannon Ross-Sheehy, Biased Competition in Infants and Adults
  • Dr. Matt Palmatier, If You Could've Stopped Kanye from Making a Fool of Himself, Would You Have Felt Obligated to Try?
  • Dr. Jon Webb, Spirituality, Forgiveness, and Suicidal Behavior among College Student Substance Abusers
  • Dr. Jill Stinson, Empirically-Based Sex Offender Treatment:  How, Who, & What We’re Treating
  • Dr. Eric Sellers, Brain-Computer Interface
  • Dr. Matt McBee, How Many People are Gifted?
  • Dr. Stacey Williams, LGB Minority Stress
  • Dr. Jamie Hirsch, Developing a Protective Model of Health: An Inappropriate Use of Data and an Excessive Use of Arrows 

Message from the Chair

Wallace E. Dixon, Jr.

Friends: 

Welcome to our web page.  This year marks our department’s periodic review, what we call an Academic Audit.  So I thought I would use this space to update our constituencies on the process. 

According to the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) Office of Academic Affairs, the Academic Audit, “is a faculty-driven model of ongoing self-reflection, peer feedback, collaboration, and teamwork based on structured conversation to improve educational quality processes in teaching and learning…and hence student success.”  Our Academic Audit site visit took place in April of 2014, but the process itself started much earlier with the preparation of our “self-study,” which was thoroughly and generously crafted by Dr. Ginni Blackhart.  Subsequent to our self-study submission, the TBR sent an auditing team to ETSU to meet with faculty, students, and various supporting and supported units linked to our department, with a focus on undergraduate programs of study.  The audit focused specifically on our undergraduate psychology major and minor, and our five concentrations (behavioral neuroscience, child psychological science, clinical psychological science, cognitive science, and general psychology). 

We had a great series of meetings with our Site Visit Team members, who were impressively informed about our department.  The Team was comprised of Frank Andrasik (Chair of Psychology at U. Memphis), Deanna Garman (Executive Director of Planning, Research, and Assessment at Walters State), and Scott Woods (Team Chair, and Dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Jackson State Community College).  But the bottom line was that we received across-the-board “Mets;” which means that we met every single evaluation criterion!  

We also received four commendations, three affirmations, and three recommendations.  In terms of commendations, the team loved our speaker series requirement, and also our “rigorous matrix of improvement initiatives.”  The team also affirmed our faculty “collegiality with each other and with internal stakeholders,” and the “democratic process utilized …when making decisions about outcomes, curriculum, and student success.” 

Our weakest link, though, was our advising system.  The team wrote, “In spite of continual efforts by the psychology faculty to improve the advising process, advising continues to be a common complaint among current and former majors.  The Visiting team cannot currently envision a workable solution without an advising center dedicated to psychology.”  This was the Team’s #1 recommendation

The advising issue did not come as a surprise to us, and certainly not to our students, because we had been struggling to address it for years.  Our majors more than doubled in less than 10-years, and we added two Ph.D. concentrations. However, it was nice to know that our external review team saw things the same way that we did.  As we move forward, and discuss the outcomes of our academic audit with ETSU administration, we hope to begin making some inroads toward improving the quality of our advising system.  This is our next great challenge. 

Thank you for visiting our webpage.  Please keep us in mind in your giving plans, and keep us informed of major professional developments taking place in your lives.  I don’t think I can overstate how much we enjoy hearing of the successes of our students.  Send any news to me directly at . If you have concerns or suggestions about how we might improve our web page, please send those to Dr. Andi Clements at .  

Sincerely, 

Wallace E. Dixon, Jr., Ph. D.
Chair and Professor of Psychology

 

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Department Mission Statement

The ETSU department of psychology advances the scientific understanding of human behavior and mental processes; first by conducting and applying original and substantive scientific inquiry, and second by apprenticing students, through both hands-on experience and classroom didactics, in the process of conducting and applying original and substantive scientific inquiry. The Department provides sufficient didactic experiences to enable students to make continuous and adequate progress toward completion of the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degree, in psychology and in other disciplines more generally.  Individual faculty strive to contribute to the collective good of the department, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the university; and to advance the good works of the community and profession at large.

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Experimental Mission Statement

The primary mission of the PhD concentration in Experimental Psychology at East Tennessee State University is to provide students with broad and general training in translational research in the psychological sciences, including the areas of developmental, cognitive, and social psychology, personality, affective behavior, and behavioral neuroscience.

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Clinical Mission Statement

The primary mission of the articulated master's/doctoral concentration in Clinical Psychology at ETSU is to provide training in clinical psychology emphasizing rural behavioral health and practice in the context of integrated primary health care.


ETSU Mission Statement

http://www.etsu.edu/president/mission.aspx

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