Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences

The Department of Health Sciences, established in 1964 and located in the College of Public Health in Lamb Hall, is a multidisciplinary department offering a variety of courses concerning those sciences relevant to the human body and human health, including Microbiology, Immunology, Pathology, Biochemistry, Anatomy and Physiology. The department offers the B.S. degree and Honors in Discipline in Health Sciences with two concentrations, Microbiology and Human Health. In addition, minors in Health Sciences and Microbiology are offered. 

Why a Career in Health Sciences?

  • Make a difference in people's health through research and services
  • Human Health is the fastest growing major in United States
  • Excellent earning potential
  • Career flexibility to become a microbiologist, medical professional or an allied health professional
  • Career opportunities both in academics and in industries

Median annual earnings of the Microbiologists were $66,260 in May 2012. The middle 50 percent earned $67,840. The highest 10 percent earned more than $117,690. The Human Health concentration is primarily for students who plan on pursuing graduate level training in health sciences. For more career information, see Microbiologists at the U.S. Department of Labor's site.


Concentration in Microbiology   Program Information

The four-year B.S. in Health Sciences (concentration in microbiology) provides the general education core, sciences, and clinical laboratory education courses necessary for career-entry preparation. Following the successful completion of the program, students receive a B.S. degree in Health Sciences. Honors in Discipline is available in this concentration.


Concentration in Human Health Program Information Concentration in Human Health

The four-year B.S. in Health Sciences (concentration in Human Health) provides the general education core, sciences, and microbial diseases- related courses with laboratory components necessary for pre-med and careers in allied health sciences. Following the successful completion of the program, students receive a B.S. degree in Health Sciences. Honors in Discipline is available in this concentration.


What Do Graduates Do?

  • Medical, veterinary, and clinical microbiologists work to maintain the health of people and animals by identifying organisms that cause disease.
  • Environmental microbiologists are concerned with microorganisms that cause pollution and those that can degrade pollutants.
  • Public Health microbiologists monitor and control communicable diseases that might spread through our water systems, food supply, or atmosphere.
  • Immunologists study the immune systems' response to infectious agents. This includes the study of allergy, vaccines, better ways to diagnose infections, and transplantation of organs and tissues.
  • Virologists work to find out how viruses can infect plants and animals, and how they, in some cases, cause tumors.
  • Mycologists investigate how fungi cause diseases, produce cheeses, breads, antibiotics, and fermented drinks.

Where Do Graduates Work? BSHS Competencies

  • Hospitals and health systems
  • Public health agencies - federal, state, and local
  • Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies
  • Research laboratories
  • Diagnostic laboratories
  • Quality control laboratories
  • Food industries
  • Academic institutions

 


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